Machlee in pink river

SKU: SUTAPR005

Rs. 2,500

Only 2 Pieces Left in Stock

Every second that she spent being away from him was a nightmare. He was her world and she was the moon that revolved around. He was her purpose, her forever. As she danced a cosmic dance around him, she quiet enjoyed the swishes and swirls that she created in the ocean of his feelings. As she watched the oceans closer, she caught a glance at how fish that were happily swimming one second were gasping for breath when taken out of it. She recognised the feeling well. For without him, she was just that fish out of water!

Length:  5.5 meters ; Width: 47 inches

Blouse Piece: No

Wash Care: 

1. Hand wash separately in cold water and salt
2. Don't soak it in water for more than 5 minutes
3. Medium iron

Blouse:  Su, the model is wearing a blouse from our in house collection. To view similar blouses - 

https://suta.in/collections/blouses

Fabric: Mul Cotton

Disclaimer: The pictures are clicked in daylight. Color may vary slightly from the image due to the screen brightness.

No matter how much we move forward in time, it is often our very roots that hold us in place. As far as our fabrics are concerned, we are in an age of constant innovation and up-gradation. Even so, our love for age-old crafts and processes like block printing can never fade. Block printing is an art that is at least a few centuries old. Especially in India, the art has evolved to incorporate the motifs and designs of different regions. It is a process of printing designs on a base fabric using wooden stamps dipped in dye. The charm lies in the fact that all the steps of block printing are done by artisans using their hands. Right from carving the wooden stamp, which itself requires a lot of expertise and skill, to printing the fabric and drying it, each step is carried out by dedicated artisans. The intricately carved stamps are a wonder by themselves and there are separate sects of artisans who specialise in this and create highly nuanced wooden stamps using chisels, drills and hammers. Once this is done, mustard oil is applied to the stamps and they are left to soak up the oil to prevent cracks. Meanwhile, the base fabric is washed and dyed. Handloom fabrics are most preferred as they absorb the colours of the print gorgeously. Following this, the fabric is laid out on a flat surface and held in place with small pins. The wooden stamp is dipped in the chosen dye and then slammed onto the fabric in one forceful motion. The entire saree or as much as required is printed this way by consecutively pressing the stamp on the fabric with force. After the process is over, the saree is washed and dried. The patience, skill and creativity of artisans come forth brilliantly with a hand block printed saree. There are bound to be small irregularities in the print as a result of human error and that lends a whole new level of allure to this art-form.

The block-printing on this saree is done on a made-in-heaven mul cotton fabric which is lighter than air and loved by our Suta Queens immensely.

The mul cotton is what we call ‘made in heaven’ at Suta. Known in West Bengal as mul mul, the fabric is what can be categorised as muslin cotton. It is believed that this fine method of weaving cotton can be traced back to even before the Indus valley civilization. What makes this fabric special is the almost magical process of weaving it. Cotton fibres are separated and spun into strong threads. The lightest and the most delicate fibres are separated and are then spun into muslin thread. These are then woven into fabrics by skilled weavers. The history of muslin weaving is a beautiful chapter in the history of Indian textiles. The process of the yore was much more complex and involved many unique tools that look primitive but worked like magic. The upper jaw of a catfish was used to initially clean the cotton before spinning. To separate the lightest fibres, a Dhunkar (a bamboo bow) was used, which when strung in a distinctive way made the lighter fibres rise above the heavier ones. This process gave the title ‘woven air’ to the muslin fabric.

 


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