Citrus in Nagpur (Saree)

SKU: SUTAMIH138

Rs. 1,800

Buy it with

(COD is not available for Fall and Edging orders. Any saree ordered with fall and edging can’t be returned or exchanged.)

Underskirts/Petticoats - Sizes
(Click here for size chart. Suta Ninja will select the best color for you. )

She doesn’t seek to be a man – that she thinks is lack of ambition. She’s a fighter. Has always been. And sometimes she’s the whole army. She lives ecstatically. You rarely see the part of her that smoulders. There is perhaps a little yearning at times, but it is vague like a breeze that brings to her a fragrance of the rural paddy fields of Bengal. Don’t get confused between her personality and her attitude – her personality is who she is, and her attitude depends on who you are. She seems to be saying – I can only please one person a day. Today is not your day. It’s mine. And tomorrow doesn’t look good either. For you. The soft weave wrapped around her is a Mul that is citrus grapefruit colour, with a light pink blush. Did you know that the colour orange is named after the fruit and it’s not the other way round? And she knows what the orange flowers smell like – it’s a fragrance that drives her mad! Nagpur is citrus orange land.

Length:  5.5 meters ; Width: 47 inches

Blouse Piece: No

Wash Care: Dry Wash 

Blouse: Su, the model is wearing a blouse Devil e Denim

https://suta.in/products/devil-e-denim-blouse

Fabric: Mul Cotton

Disclaimer: The pictures are clicked in daylight. Color may vary slightly from the image due to the screen brightness.

The mul cotton is what we call ‘made in heaven’ at Suta. Known in West Bengal as mul mul, the fabric is what can be categorised as muslin cotton. It is believed that this fine method of weaving cotton can be traced back to even before the Indus valley civilization. What makes this fabric special is the almost magical process of weaving it. Cotton fibres are separated and spun into strong threads. The lightest and the most delicate fibres are separated and are then spun into muslin thread. These are then woven into fabrics by skilled weavers. The history of muslin weaving is a beautiful chapter in the history of Indian textiles. The process of the yore was much more complex and involved many unique tools that look primitive but worked like magic. The upper jaw of a catfish was used to initially clean the cotton before spinning. To separate the lightest fibres, a Dhunkar (a bamboo bow) was used, which when strung in a distinctive way made the lighter fibres rise above the heavier ones. This process gave the title ‘woven air’ to the muslin fabric. Weavers famously wove on looms that were at ground level and operated the looms from pits dug in the ground. Even during the Mughal era, the muslin fabric was seen as a symbol of power for its finesse. History is full of anecdotes to prove the awe that the muslin fabric generated. Emperor Aurangazeb is said to have chided his daughter Zeb-un-Nisa for appearing naked in the court when in reality she had been wearing several layers of the muslin cloth! Such was the fabric’s delicateness. The almost invisible fabric had made an Arab traveller in the 10 th century remark that the degree of fineness is such that a garment can be drawn through a ring of a middling size. During the British colonisation and even during the Mughal rule, the art of weaving muslin took a hit as weavers were treated poorly and drought hit many of the weaving centres. As a result, today, the process of weaving has seen a lot of change. Nevertheless, the essence of it hasn’t changed and the charm of the fabric still remains.

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